documentary-style photography for capturing human moments

Laurie RhodesA favorite quote of mine comes from Alfred Eisenstadt, one of the most prolific photojournalists of the twentieth century: “It is more important to click with the person than to click with the shutter.” More than anything, this speaks to why I succeed as a documentary-style wedding photographer.

I’ve always enjoyed people immensely, from all walks of life and from wherever I’ve been in the world. I’m friendly, easy-going, curious, kind, supportive, and flexible. I listen and observe. These characteristics, combined with my artistic vision and technical expertise, allow me to capture poignant, humorous and truly candid photos of people and their environment.

I photograph people the way they are and the interactions that happen between them. I am constantly on the lookout for a hidden smile, a knowing look, a private joke, acrobatic moves on the dance floor — any interaction that creates energy while telling a story. A favorite moment was at Christopher and Jeremy’s wedding — their families surprised them by performing a flash mob on the dance floor! Another was at Hannah & Ben’s wedding ceremony at Gedney Farms in the Berkshires — the reaction from the guests to spoken words was so powerful, so simultaneous, that that was the moment — it’s written on their faces.

With all my photographs, my eye is drawn to emotion and gesture with a backdrop of light, color, shape and shadow. This is especially true when I photograph a couple. I scout the area beforehand, looking for just the right locations to “frame” and to place them in the environment, whether it’s stunning architecture or a striking landscape.

When documenting weddings, I also take artistic ambiance and detail photos that evoke a “sense of place.” Given the significant time and resources my clients dedicate to creating just the right backdrop for their wedding day, I feel it’s important to represent these details in the photos.

Photography was not my first career. Although I learned the basics of photography from my father, who gave me a Kodak Instamatic when I was 8-years-old, I built a career in the entertainment business working for Broadway producers McCann & Nugent, CBS, Inc. and Paramount Pictures Television division. While working on the Maury Povich Show, I photographed my colleagues, one of whom asked me to photograph her wedding. It was so incredible to photograph my first wedding and she LOVED the photos! During that same year I photographed a friend’s baby playing with water in the kitchen sink. After this photo won an award, my friends encouraged me to become a professional photographer. I just celebrated my 15-year anniversary as a wedding and portrait photographer.

Learn more about my photography training, awards, exhibitions and work history. If you’re planning, I would love to hear the details — I’m happy to schedule a phone call, Skype session or an in-person meeting.

Laurie RhodesA favorite quote of mine comes from Alfred Eisenstadt, one of the most prolific photojournalists of the twentieth century: “It is more important to click with the person than to click with the shutter.” More than anything, this speaks to why I succeed as a documentary-style wedding photographer.

I’ve always enjoyed people immensely, from all walks of life and from wherever I’ve been in the world. I’m friendly, easy-going, curious, kind, supportive, and flexible. I listen and observe. These characteristics, combined with my artistic vision and technical expertise, allow me to capture poignant, humorous and truly candid photos of people and their environment.

I photograph people the way they are and the interactions that happen between them. I am constantly on the lookout for a hidden smile, a knowing look, a private joke, acrobatic moves on the dance floor — any interaction that creates energy while telling a story. A favorite moment was at Christopher and Jeremy’s wedding — their families surprised them by performing a flash mob on the dance floor! Another was at Hannah & Ben’s wedding ceremony at Gedney Farms in the Berkshires — the reaction from the guests to spoken words was so powerful, so simultaneous, that that was the moment — it’s written on their faces.

With all my photographs, my eye is drawn to emotion and gesture with a backdrop of light, color, shape and shadow. This is especially true when I photograph a couple. I scout the area beforehand, looking for just the right locations to “frame” and to place them in the environment, whether it’s stunning architecture or a striking landscape.

When documenting weddings, I also take artistic ambiance and detail photos that evoke a “sense of place.” Given the significant time and resources my clients dedicate to creating just the right backdrop for their wedding day, I feel it’s important to represent these details in the photos.

Photography was not my first career. Although I learned the basics of photography from my father, who gave me a Kodak Instamatic when I was 8-years-old, I built a career in the entertainment business working for Broadway producers McCann & Nugent, CBS, Inc. and Paramount Pictures Television division. While working on the Maury Povich Show, I photographed my colleagues, one of whom asked me to photograph her wedding. It was so incredible to photograph my first wedding and she LOVED the photos! During that same year I photographed a friend’s baby playing with water in the kitchen sink. After this photo won an award, my friends encouraged me to become a professional photographer. I just celebrated my 15-year anniversary as a wedding and portrait photographer.

Learn more about my photography training, awards, exhibitions and work history. If you’re planning, I would love to hear the details — I’m happy to schedule a phone call, Skype session or an in-person meeting.

“One of New York’s finest photographers”
—Professional Photographer Magazine

contact laurie